Thursday, September 16, 2010

Ricecooker Tibetan Rice Pudding

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Apparently, Tibet is a fairly sunny place. It is the top of the world after all. That has to make it a little closer to the sun. Per capita, Tibet is said to be much sunnier than say Buffalo. But, in your mind, what is Tibet like? Here is how it resides in my mind’s eye:

You are quietly nestled into a silken quilt. Your toes are tracing the embroidery, while at the same time, dipping into the yak fur rug underneath. The cold of the ground is close enough, but in your quiet repose, you are safe. There is a faint hint of earthiness on your lips. You mindlessly lick the last unctuous, salty remnants of the yak butter tea from the crease of your mouth. The wind rustles outside your portable home. It whips and churns, picking up speed in every rocky crag, returning with renewed vengeance. The sound of wind and rock and wind resonate. In your quiet bed, you look over to the small red lacquer stand, with its one cup, spoon, prayer scroll. Your mind follows the curlicues marked on its surface in time with the wind. And, slowly, you fall asleep, as if you are alone on the moon.

(Also, I joined a contest called Project Food Blog 2010. Find my entry here, and begin voting on September 20. If you plan to vote for someone else, the voting starts September 30.)

Recipe:
Tibetan Rice Pudding
Adapted from Beyond the Great Wall by Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid
In a rice cooker set to make white rice, add:
¾ cup brown broken rice/ rose matta
1 cup evaporate milk
1 cup whole milk
1 cup water
1 T brown sugar (or less)
½ tsp cardamom
¼ cup golden raisins
¼ cup dried apples
¼ cup unsulfured apricots

Top with pistachios that have been browned in ghee

11 comments:

Joanne said...

haha you are too funny. I love your PFB quip.

Tibet sounds so peaceful from your description. The perfect place to eat some delicious rice pudding, i'm sure.

Vaishali said...

I love your vision of Tibet. I've been to Leh, across the border in India, and it is one of the most beautiful places on earth.
That pudding sounds luscious. Would love to try a version with soy or almond milk sometime.

sophia said...

Hee, I always thought of Tibet as this cold bitter place full of caves and monks. I know, I'm such an ignoramus.

I'll bet this pudding can be made in a slow-cooker, too! Yum~

Jenn AKA The Leftover Queen said...

Sounds so yummy and flavorful! Love the post too.

Shaheen {The Purple Foodie} said...

I have the exact same picture of Tibet in my mind!

Ahahah you had me cracking up about "if you're voting for someone else, voting starts Sept 30"

Ellie (Almost Bourdain) said...

I have not heard of this dish! It's so intriguing. Thanks for sharing.

Jonny said...

I love the combination of dried fruit, cardamom and evaporated milk whether Tibetan or local, not to mention ghee-browned pistachios! Bet it would go great with some yak-butter tea, wowzas! One of my favorite books is Heinrich Harrer's "Seven Years in Tibet" in which he describes the roof of the world as not only being very sunny but also very dry, and hence, he says Tibetans are among the "ripest of human specimens" bathing on average only a few times a year. That cardamom scent better be strong I guess!

Jonny said...

I love the combination of dried fruit, cardamom and evaporated milk whether Tibetan or local, not to mention ghee-browned pistachios! Bet it would go great with some yak-butter tea, wowzas! One of my favorite books is Heinrich Harrer's "Seven Years in Tibet" in which he describes the roof of the world as not only being very sunny but also very dry, and hence, he says Tibetans are among the "ripest of human specimens" bathing on average only a few times a year. That cardamom scent better be strong I guess!

lisaiscooking said...

I don't think I'd enjoy yak butter tea, but I'd like to see Tibet anyway. This rice pudding sounds warm and wonderful!

Foodycat said...

I love pretty much any version of rice pudding, but this one sounds seriously delicious!

My mental image of Tibet is bloody cold, but not as richly detailed as yours!

e.m.b. said...

Oh my goodness. This looks delicious.
Fall is the perfect time for pudding.
I'm making some!